In Indian Mexico
Language: en
Pages: 220
Authors: Frederick Starr
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010 - Publisher: Rarebooksclub.com

Excerpt: ...great excitement, "Toro, muy bravo " (Bull, very fierce ) and hastened forward to catch the lasso wound round the horns of the beast to lead him out of our way. Just then the bull took matters into his own control, and, with a snort and plunge, started wildly away, dragging the old fellow at a wild run down the trail, finally whirling him and the baby into a heap by the roadside, while he himself took up the mountain-side. It was after dark before we reached Papalo. After much grumbling, supper was prepared and a solemn promise given that we should leave at seven in the morning. When we were ready, no animals were to be seen. The presidente asserted that the price which we had paid was only to that point, and that if we wanted animals for Cuicatlan we must make a new arrangement. This was sheer blackmail, because there had been no misunderstanding in the matter, and a liberal price had been paid. After wrangling for an hour, we shook the dust of Papalo literally from our feet, and started to walk to Cuicatlan, telling the town authorities that our burdens must be taken by mozos to the cabecera before three o'clock, and that we should pay nothing for the service. Probably we should not have been so ready to take this heroic action if we had not remembered that the road was down hill all the way, and good walking. Still, fifteen miles is fifteen miles, and the sun was hot, and though we left at 8:30, it was two o'clock before we entered Cuicatlan. We had no adventures by the way, except the killing of a coral snake which lay in the middle of the road. At three the mozos with their burdens arrived, and felt it very hard that we kept our promise of paying nothing for their service. CHAPTER XVIII TO COIXTLAHUACA (1900) For a day we rested at Cuicatlan to make arrangements for a trip to the land of the Chochos. We complained bitterly to the jefe politico regarding the miserable animals which had been supplied us for our last journey, and demanded...
In Indian Mexico
Language: en
Pages: 464
Authors: Frederick Starr
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-05-24 - Publisher: Pinnacle Press

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
In Indian Mexico (1908)
Language: en
Pages: 425
Authors: Frederick Starr
Categories: Indians of Mexico
Type: BOOK - Published: 1908 - Publisher: Library of Alexandria

The reading public may well ask, Why another travel book on Mexico? Few countries have been so frequently written up by the traveler. Many books, good, bad, and indifferent, but chiefly bad, have been perpetrated. Most of these books, however, cover the same ground, and ground which has been traversed by many people. Indian Mexico is practically unknown. The only travel-book regarding it, in English, is Lumholtz's "Unknown Mexico." The indians among whom Lumholtz worked lived in northwestern Mexico; those among whom I have studied are in southern Mexico. The only district where his work and mine overlap is the Tarascan area. In fact, then, I write upon an almost unknown and untouched subject. Lumholtz studied life and customs; my study has been the physical type of south Mexican indians. Within the area covered by Lumholtz, the physical characteristics of the tribes have been studied by Hrdlicka. His studies and my own are practically the only investigations within the field. There are two Mexicos. Northern Mexico to the latitude of the capital city is a mestizo country; the indians of pure blood within that area occupy limited and circumscribed regions. Southern Mexico is indian country; there are large regions, where the mestizos, not the indians, are the exception. From the time of my first contact with Mexican indians, I was impressed with the notable differences between tribes, and desired to make a serious study of their types. In 1895, the accidental meeting with a priest from Guatemala led to my making a journey to Central America. It was on that journey that I saw how the work in question might be done. While the government of Mexico is modeled upon the same pattern as our own, it is far more paternal in its nature. The Republic is a confederation of sovereign states, each of which has its elected governor. The states are subdivided into districts somewhat corresponding to our counties, over each of which is a jefe politico appointed by the governor; he has no responsibility to those below him, but is directly responsible to the man who names him, and who can at will remove him; he is not expected to trouble the state government unnecessarily, and as long as he turns over the taxes which are due the state he is given a free hand. Within the districts are the cities and towns, each with its local, independent, elected town government.
Apaches at War and Peace
Language: en
Pages: 300
Authors: William B. Griffen
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1988 - Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

This is the story of the Chiricahua Apaches on the northern frontier of New Spain from 1750 to 1858, especially those within the region of the Janos presidio in northwestern Chihuahua. Using previously untapped archives in Spain, Mexico, & the United States, William Griffen relates how Apache raids & other hostilities were the norm until Bernardo de Galvez, viceroy of New Spain, encouraged the Apaches to settle near presidios. By 1790 some Apaches were in residence at Janos, & intermittent periods of peace & conflict ensued until Mexican independence brought more radical changes in Indian policy (such as the state of Sonora's offer of bounties for Indian scalps). Griffen explores issues of changing Indian policy, Indian-Mexican relations, & the entry of the United States onto the scene after its invasion of Mexico. For this reprint he includes a new preface discussing recent research issues. "A landmark work that is sure to become a standard source for the story of Apaches in Northern Mexico." - ETHNOHISTORY. "A solidly researched study that adds to our knowledge of Indian relations on the Spanish borderland frontier." - AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW. William B. Griffen is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Northern Arizona University & the author of UTMOST GOOD FAITH: PATTERNS OF APACHE-MEXICAN HOSTILITIES IN NORTHERN CHIHUAHUA BORDER WARFARE, 1821-1848.
Mexico's Sierra Tarahumara
Language: en
Pages: 212
Authors: William Dirk Raat
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1996 - Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

The Tarahumara, "people of the edge", live on the boundaries of civilization, in the mountains and canyonlands of Mexico's Sierra Tarahumara. There, in southwestern Chihuahua, terrain terminates at the edge of canyons; there mountains border the sky. In these pages, words by W. Dirk Raat and images by George R. Janecek are testimony to the endurance of the Tarahumara people. Today, roughly fifty thousand Tarahumaras continue living in ways similar to those of their ancestors, retaining many customs from their pre-Columbian past. At the same time, as outsiders modify the environment in an effort to subsist - and to profit - the Tarahumara have adapted their culture in order to survive. Contemporary Tarahumara culture is a product largely of the Jesuit era, from 1607 to 1767. The native people responded to the Spanish either by trying to live beyond the influence of the Church or by becoming Christianized Indians and seeking Church protection. This distinction still can be seen. However, even those who became Christian did not succumb to attempts to eradicate traditional religious and cultural practices. Rather they incorporated Christianity into their own world view. The nineteenth century saw the arrival of gold and silver miners and of American promoters seeking to extend their commercial empire into northern Mexico. The twentieth century has witnessed the Mexican Revolution and the emergence of the "mestizo age". In the canyon homelands of the Tarahumara, railroads and electricity have facilitated extensive timber and copper mining as well as increased tourism.